Blinded by Thought|Sitting Buddha Hermitage

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Many years ago I taught myself to draw utilizing a book called Drawing on the Right Side of theBrain by Betty Edwards Her facility is that anybody who can hold a pencil and make a straight line can draw. Since our believing mind– the left side of the brain– pirates our understanding, The issue is that we do not see what is in front of us.

Look mind believes it currently understands what things appear like which blinds it to the reality.It at a straight-sided mug, for example. But appears to have straight sides with an ellipse on top and a partial ellipse at the bottom.

The if you draw that you get pointy bits where the sides satisfy the bottom and leading edges, whereas in truth these locations are rounded.

Just book consists of a variety of workouts to make you actually take a look at things, such as drawing the irregular areas in between things that the mind can’t rate. When I found out to look, I was astonished at how rapidly my illustration enhanced.Those so with our other observant professors, for instance listening.

Once people who teach will, I’m sure, have had the experience of discussing something completely plainly, and potentially more than as soon as, just to learn later on that a trainee thought we stated something entirely various since that was what they currently had in their mind therefore did not hear what we in fact stated.Just we understand that this is how our mind works we can cultivate the capability to let go of thought and view more plainly. The as I might find out to see and draw more properly, we can end up being conscious of how our ideas can avoid us from hearing what is being stated, or comprehending the truth of a scenario. Shunryu Suzuki following quote from Zen Mind in Beginner, Mind ‘s

In provides us an idea:

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[ad_2] the novice’s mind there are lots of possibilities, however in the specialist’s there are couple of.(*)

No Problem | Sitting Buddha Hermitage

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What would your life be like if you had no problems? And what if I suggested you that you have no problems? I don’t mean that all the tough stuff stops happening, I mean that it ceases to be a problem for you because you don’t see it as such.

How would you define the term problem? I think it is something along the lines of an unpleasant, unwanted or unexpected situation that is painful or difficult to deal with. It also carries an implicit sense that something is wrong. Maybe I think that something is wrong with me. Or I think that something is wrong with the world that delivered me up this problem.

Notice that this is all taking place in the realm of thought. Whatever the situation that we are facing, it is a coming together of causes and conditions. Just that. It is we who label it problem.

The Buddhist view is that each moment, in its arising, is immaculate, exactly what it needs to be. Our life is unfolding perfectly.

In Rev. Master Jiyu’s diary of her years in Japan, published as The Wild White Goose, there is a passage (p. 44 of the 2002 second edition) that she wrote after experiencing the beginnings of her first kensho (enlightennment experience):

The only thing I can possibly do in order to learn anything is to accept, in blind faith, everything that is happening to me, believing that it is all for my good, whatever it may be.

And there is a footnote to this, which says:

This is probably the most important sentence in the book from the point of view of someone who wishes to learn Zen.

What if you were to take the attitude that everything that happens is for your own good? Even if that seems far-fetched to you at the moment it is at least as valid a view as thinking of life’s difficult situations as problems. And doesn’t it make you feel more open instead of closed down? Doesn’t it make the whole situation more workable? I pose these questions for you to answer from your own experience, if you wish to explore this for yourself.

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Right Effort | Sitting Buddha Hermitage

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Right Effort is the effort to think, speak and act skilfully. It is traditionally described as the effort to prevent and overcome negative states of mind and to cultivate and maintain positive states of mind. So it is primarily concerned with mental, rather than physical effort.

So what does this mean in practice? When we are doing seated meditation it is pretty obvious that right effort is the effort required to keep our mind in the present moment, letting go of thought as it arises and paying attention to our inner landscape in a completely non-judgemental way.

As we go about our daily lives, however, we generally need to adopt a broader awareness. Sometimes it will be appropriate to bring a very focussed concentration to a task, but much of the time I think our awareness is more free-flowing. How then to apply right effort?

I’ve thought about this a lot recently and we discussed it at our Wednesday Sangha Evening. Last Saturday I attended the Regional Sangha Day in Leeds and joined a discussion on How can we be more present? which really ties in with right effort, and decided to continue this topic the following day on the day retreat here at the Hermitage. So with thanks to all who contributed their thoughts, the way that I am currently thinking of right effort is:

Right Effort is the effort to be present to oneself.

By which I mean that we have sufficient awareness of ourselves to be able to sense and respond to that inner prompting that nudges us to lend a hand, offer a kind word, stop what we were about to do, alter our course and all those other fine adjustments we make if we go through our day with an open mind and heart and an attitude of listening, both within and without.

The opposite to this would be the person who is determined to stick to their plan, to do things their own way, who is tuned out to any input from whatever source. This may take a lot of effort but it is certainly not right effort.

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